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July 2013
Canada Day ,formerly Dominion Day , is Canada's national day, a federal statutory holiday, celebrating the
anniversary of the July 1, 1867 enactment of the British North America Act of 1867, which united Canada as a
single country of four provinces. Canada Day observances take place throughout Canada as well as
internationally.
The name was officially changed from Dominion Day to Canada Day on October 27, 1982.
Most communities across the country  host organized celebrations for Canada Day, usually outdoor
public events, such as parades, carnivals, festivals, barbecues, air and maritime shows, fireworks, and
free musical concerts,[12] as well as citizenship ceremonies for new citizens.
Canada and the United States share the world's longest undefended border, co-operate on military
campaigns and exercises, and are each other's largest trading partner.
Canada is noted for having a strong and positive relationship with the Netherlands (which Canada helped liberate during World War II), and the
Dutch government traditionally gives tulips, a symbol of the Netherlands, to Canada each year in remembrance of Canada's contribution to its
liberation.
In the United States, Independence Day, commonly known as the Fourth of July,
is a federal holiday commemorating the adoption of the Declaration of Independence on
July 4, 1776, declaring independence from the Kingdom of Great Britain. Independence
Day is commonly associated with fireworks, parades, barbecues, carnivals, picnics,
concerts, baseball games, political speeches and ceremonies, and various other public
and private events celebrating the history, government, and traditions of the United
States.
July 4th, 2013
July 1st, 2013
4th of July fun facts and trivia:

  • Benjamin Franklin wanted the turkey to be the national animal but was outvoted when John Adams and Thomas Jefferson chose the bald eagle.
  • Over an estimated 150 million hot dogs will be consumed today. That's roughly 1 dog for every two people in the U.S.
  • The first 4th of July party held at the White House was in 1801.
  • The 4th of July was not declared a national holiday until 1941.
  • The national anthem is actually set to the tune of an old English drinking song called To Anacreon in Heaven.
  • When the United States became a country, there were approximately 2.5 million people living in the country. Today the population is around
    304 million.


Do they have a 4th of July in England?

Of course they do. That’s how they get from the 3rd to the 5th!
    


Have a Happy and Safe July 4th!    
Canada Day 2011 in Ottawa - July 1, 2011

The Nation's Capital is the headquarters for Canada's birthday celebration on July 1, 2011.
Each year, hundreds of thousands of people visit Parliament Hill, Major's Hill Park,
Jacques-Cartier Park, and other locations in the surrounding areas to celebrate Canada.
This year marks Canada's 144th birthday.
And this year, the special guests are Prince William and Princess Kate, who will be here
as part of the Royal Tour.
Very few people have to work on Independence Day. It is a day of family celebrations with picnics and barbecues, showing a great deal of emphasis
on the American tradition of political freedom. Activities associated with the day include watermelon or hotdog eating competitions and sporting
events, such as baseball games, three-legged races, swimming activities and tug-of-war games.

Many people display the American flag outside their homes or buildings. Many communities arrange fireworks that are often accompanied by patriotic
music. The most impressive fireworks are shown on television. Some employees use one or more of their vacation days to create a long weekend so
that they can escape the heat at their favorite beach or vacation spot.

Independence Day is a patriotic holiday for celebrating the positive aspects of the United States. Many politicians appear at public events to show
their support for the history, heritage and people of their country. Above all, people in the United States express and give thanks for the freedom and
liberties fought by the first generation of many of today's Americans.